Approximate Jewish Partisan activity marked in yellow.
Czechoslovakia

Czechoslovakia Jews experienced high amounts of antisemitism so most Jews his their identity and fought as non-Jews. Czechoslovakian Jewish partisans also made outstanding accomplishments as members of all-Jewish groups. The most famous of the Czechoslovakian Jewish partisan units, the Novaky brigade, formed from the inmates of Novaky concentration camp. Members of the Communist and Zionist youth movements mobilized their community within the camp for self-defense, and prepared for armed resistance. The Novaky brigade benefited from a strategic locale: the camp was in a region populated by miners and farmers who had no sympathy for the pro-Axis government. With the help of these friendly locals, the Novaky brigade made contacts with other partisans, and arranged to receive aid and weapons in the event of an armed uprising. While large-scale preparation was difficult in the camp, the Novaky group developed a military model of organization, arranged for the escape of the camp's non-fighting members, and carried out regular, secret drills with actual weapons.

On August 28, 1944, the Novaky brigade took control of the concentration camp, declared all inmates free, and called upon the able-bodied among them to join the uprising against the government. Two-hundred fifty prisoners joined the partisans. The next day, the Novaky brigade took part in the Czechoslovakian uprising as part of the wider Czechoslovak insurgent forces. With another unit, they occupied two towns populated by active Nazis, engaging in intense gun battles. The Novaky group continued to carry out armed resistance through 1944, gaining commendations even from their enemy. One German commander wrote to the Novaky leader, "I am-no, I had better say, I was an antisemite. Thank you for your men, both living and dead." In honor of their service to their country, 166 Jewish partisans were awarded the Order of the Slovak Uprising.

Find out who the partisans were and how they fought the Nazis. Go to the Films section to view the film that compliments this study guide.

Not a study guide at all, but a document for communities wanting to acknowledge the intenet of Holoucast Rememberacne Day as it was started in Israel, in 1951. Includes a brief history and reading.

Learn how the partisans fought hunger and survived the harsh winter cold. How did they survive? Go to the Films section to view the film that compliments this study guide.

Learn how a determined Ben helped initially free 600 Jews from a Nazi work camp. Go to the Films section to view the film that compliments this study guide.

Find out how a woman partisan earns one of the Soviet Unions highest honors. Go to the Films section to view the film that compliments this study guide.

Meet Frank, a determined fighter who escaped the ghettos and valiantly fought against his oppressors. Go to the Films section to view the film that compliments this study guide.

Many Jews suffered from antisemtism in the partisans, even though they were fighting a common enemy. Read this study guide to learn about the role antisemitism played in and out of the partisan units and how it differed from region to region.